How a Mobility Aid Can Fight a Rare Disease

Canadian Lisa Walters lives with a rare disease that made her dislocate her shoulder just by high-fiving her husband for doing the dishes. It’s called Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS) and it took doctors more than 10 years to get it diagnosed. All this time she had this underlying sense of fear about leaving the house because she could not trust her body.

“My shoulders, hips, and knees are extremely unstable so I can be going about my day minding my own business and then bam, my hip is out and I’m waddling around the house like a penguin. My mobility can honestly change 20 times in a single day. That can make it hard to plan ahead for things like work, volunteer commitments, or hanging out with friends.”

“I often say that EDS has taken away my ability to be spontaneous because so much planning has to go into me being able to leave the house to do a thing. For years I was using canes and several different types of crutches, but my needs were changing so quickly that I couldn’t keep up with what mobility aid I needed to use when.”

“I couldn’t leave the house with approximately seventy-five different mobility aids because I only have two hands (and they aren’t great at holding even one!). I felt it was time to try something different, to see if I could gain some sense of freedom back.”

The 30 year-old has some better days than others, but even on the good days the EDS still affects her ability to walk, talk, work, or have fun.

Canadian Lisa Walters lives with a rare disease that made her dislocate her shoulder just by high-fiving her husband for doing the dishes. It’s called Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS) and it took doctors more than 10 years to get it diagnosed. All this time she had this underlying sense of fear about leaving the house because she could not trust her body.

“My shoulders, hips, and knees are extremely unstable so I can be going about my day minding my own business and then bam, my hip is out and I’m waddling around the house like a penguin. My mobility can honestly change 20 times in a single day. That can make it hard to plan ahead for things like work, volunteer commitments, or hanging out with friends.”

“I often say that EDS has taken away my ability to be spontaneous because so much planning has to go into me being able to leave the house to do a thing. For years I was using canes and several different types of crutches, but my needs were changing so quickly that I couldn’t keep up with what mobility aid I needed to use when.”

“I couldn’t leave the house with approximately seventy-five different mobility aids because I only have two hands (and they aren’t great at holding even one!). I felt it was time to try something different, to see if I could gain some sense of freedom back.”

“It also serves as a very sturdy and reliable dessert tray when I don’t have the ability to carry my cake from room to room in my house, but I want the option of eating cake throughout the day. I wish I was joking about that, but this girl really loves cake.”

Lisa now uses a Rollz Motion and says her life changed for the better since. She feels a lot less anxiety when leaving the house knowing her rollator can be transformed in a wheelchair if her legs stop cooperating.

“It’s hard to put into words just how much my world feels like it’s opening up since I’ve been using a Rollz Motion. It’s certainly helping me physically, but I’m amazed by how much it’s helping me psychologically.”

“I feel a lot less anxiety when I leave the house now, because I know there’s a fail-safe in the form of the transport chair that I can use if my legs start acting like divas.”

“The Rollz Motion feels like a really big step forward for someone like me with the type of disease that I have. It’s extremely refreshing to know that companies producing mobility aids are now starting to pay closer attention to the fact that disability can be fluid and some of us need more than just one option when we leave the house.”

 

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