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17 & 18
March 2020

NEC
Birmingham

CDP Certified

Innovations for the Future of Independent Living

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  • Man in wheelchair talking to another man, with caption: Providing an unparalleled platform to enter and develop in the £249 billion disability market

Let's talk about MS

Restaurant Tech Live blog post 1

Did you know that Multiple Sclerosis affects more than 100,000 people in the UK? That means roughly 1 in every 1,000 people in the UK is living with MS - but there is still a widespread ignorance of what it is and what it means for the people who have it.

MS is classified as an autoimmune disease, which means it occurs as a result of the body’s immune system attacking itself. In the case of MS, the immune system attacks the fatty material, called Myelin, which coats the nerve fibres around the brain and spinal cord. Without the outer casing to properly protect the nerves, the nerves themselves become damaged, and scar tissue may form. Damaged nerves cannot send accurate signals to the rest of the body, which results in some of the symptoms associated with MS.

Because MS can affect many different nerves, and of these different nerves it can impact them in many different ways, MS symptoms look different for everyone. This means that for some, MS might look like fatigue and memory problems, for others it causes trouble walking, blurred vision or even numbness. 

Although there are many treatments to manage the symptoms of MS, there is, currently no cure. Of course, because of the varied nature of MS some people require more intensive treatments than others, and there is no ‘one cure fits all’ solution.

The effects of MS can also occur in different ways for different people; some find that their MS slowly gets worse over time, while others may experience a ‘relapse’ intermittently, when their condition suddenly gets noticeably worse.

Although there is no cure for MS, in recent times scientists have found that some treatments are effective in preventing relapses, or slowing any deterioration. Many agree the future for MS is likely to be in prevention, rather than in a complete cure.

Naidex brings together the whole sector of disability, so it’s a perfect place for someone affected by symptoms which vary in type and severity to find help. If you want to find out who you’ll be able to meet at Naidex this year take a look at out exhibitor page, and of course, you can register for free tickets here

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